Russel Doty: IoT Security for Developers

Previous articles focused on how to securely design and configure a system based on existing hardware, software, IoT Devices, and networks. If you are developing IoT devices, software, and systems, there is a lot more you can do to develop secure systems.

The first thing is to manage and secure communications with IoT Devices. Your software needs to be able to discover, configure, manage and communicate with IoT devices. By considering security implications when designing and implementing these functions you can make the system much more robust. The basic guideline is don’t trust any device. Have checks to verify that a device is what it claims to be, to verify device integrity, and to validate communications with the devices.

Have a special process for discovering and registering devices and restrict access to it. Do not automatically detect and register any device that pops up on the network! Have a mechanism for pairing devices with the gateway, such as a special pairing mode that must be invoked on both the device and the gateway to pair or a requirement to manually enter a device serial number or address into the gateway as part of the registration process. For industrial applications adding devices is a deliberate process – this is not a good operation to fully automate!

A solid approach to gateway and device identity is to have a certificate provisioned onto the device at the factory, by the system integrator, or at a central facility. It is even better if this certificate is backed by a HW root of trust that can’t be copied or spoofed.

Communications between the gateway and the device should be designed. Instead of a general network connection, which can be used for many purposes, consider using a specialized interface. Messaging interfaces are ideal for many IoT applications. Two of the most popular messaging interfaces are MQTT (Message Queued Telemetry Transport) and CoAP. In addition to their many other advantages, these messaging interfaces only carry IoT data, greatly reducing their capability to be used as an attack vector.

Message based interfaces are also a good approach for connecting the IoT Gateway to backend systems. An enterprise message bus like AMQP is a powerful tool for handling asynchronous inputs from thousands of gateways, routing them, and feeding the data into backend systems. A messaging system makes the total system more reliable, more robust, and more efficient – and makes it much easier to implement large scale systems! Messaging interfaces are ideal for handling exceptions – they allow you to simply send the exception as a regular message and have it properly processed and routed by business logic on the backend.

Messaging systems are also ideal for handling unreliable networks and heavy system loads. A messaging system will queue up messages until the network is available. If a sudden burst of activity causes the network and backend systems to be overloaded the messaging system will automatically queue up the messages and then release them for processing as resources become available. Messaging systems allow you to ensure reliable message delivery, which is critical for many applications. Best of all, messaging systems are easy for a programmer to use and do the hard work of building a robust communications capability for you.

No matter what type of interface you are using it is critical to sanitize your inputs. Never just pass through information from a device – instead, check it to make sure that is properly formatted, that it makes sense, that it does not contain a malicious payload, and that the data has not been corrupted. The overall integrity of an IoT system is greatly enhanced by ensuring the quality of the data it is operating on. Perhaps the best example of this is Little Bobby Tables from XKCD (XKCD.com):

Importance of sanitizing your input.

Importance of sanitizing your input.

On a more serious level, poor input sanitization is responsible for many security issues. Programmers should assume that users can’t be trusted and all interactions are a potential attack.


Source From: fedoraplanet.org.
Original article title: Russel Doty: IoT Security for Developers.
This full article can be read at: Russel Doty: IoT Security for Developers.

Advertisement


Random Article You May Like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*