Peter Hutterer: libinput and its device quirks files

This post does not describe a configuration system. If that’s all you care about, read this post here and go be angry at someone else. Anyway, with that out of the way let’s get started.

For a long time, libinput has supported model quirks (first added in Apr 2015). These model quirks are bitflags applied to some devices so we can enable special behaviours in the code. Model flags can be very specific (“this is a Lenovo x230 Touchpad”) or generic (“This is a trackball”) and it just depends on what the specific behaviour is that we need. The x230 touchpad for example has a custom pointer acceleration but trackballs are marked so they get some config options mice don’t have/need.

In addition to model tags we also have custom attributes. These are free-form and provide information that we cannot get from the kernel. These too can be specific (“this model needs a pressure threshold of N”) or generic (“bluetooth keyboards are an external keyboards”).

Overall, it’s a good system. Most users never have to care that we even have this. The whole point is that any device-specific quirks need to be merged only once for each model, then everyone with the same device gets to benefit on the next update.

Originally quirks were hardcoded but this required rebuilding libinput for any changes. So we moved this to utilise the udev hwdb. For the trivial work of fetching udev properties we got a lot of flexibility in how we can match against devices. For example, an entry may look like this:


libinput:name:*AlpsPS/2 ALPS GlidePoint:dmi:*svnDellInc.:pnLatitudeE6220:*
LIBINPUT_ATTR_PRESSURE_RANGE=100:90

The above uses a name match and the dmi modalias match to apply a property for the touchpad on the Dell Latitude E6330. The exact match format is defined by a bunch of udev rules that ship as part of libinput.

Using the udev hwdb maked the quirk storage a plaintext file that can be updated independently of libinput, including local overrides for testing things before merging them upstream. Having said that, it’s definitely not public API and can change even between stable branch updates as properties are renamed or rescoped to fit the behaviour more accurately. For example, a model-specific tag may be renamed to a behaviour-specific tag as we find more devices affected by the same issue.

The main issue with the quirks now is that we keep accumulating more and more of them and I’m starting to hit limits with the udev hwdb match behaviour. The hwdb is great for single matches but not so great for cascading matches where one match may overwrite another match. The hwdb match system is largely implementation-defined so it’s not always predictable which match rule wins out in the end.

Second, debugging the udev hwdb is not at all trivial. It’s a bit like git – once you’re used to it it’s just fine but until then the air turns yellow with all the swearing being excreted by the unsuspecting user.

So long story short, libinput 1.12 will replace the hwdb model quirks database with a set of .ini files. The model quirks will be installed in /usr/share/libinput/ or whatever prefix your distribution prefers instead. It’s a bunch of files with fairly simplistic instructions, each [section] has a set of MatchFoo=Bar directives and the ModelFoo=bar or AttrFoo=bar tags. See this file for an example. If all MatchFoo directives apply to a device, the Model and Attr tags are applied. Matching works in inter- and intra-file sequential order so the last section in a file overrides the first section of that file and the highest-sorting file overrides the lowest-sorting file. Otherwise the tags are accumulated, so if two files match on the same device with different tags, both tags are applied. So far, so unexciting.

Sometimes it’s necessary to install a temporary local quirk until upstream libinput is updated or the distribution updates its package. For this, the /etc/libinput/local-overrides.quirks file is read in as well (if it exists). Note though that the config files are considered internal API, so any local overrides may stop working on the next libinput update. Should’ve upstreamed that quirk, eh?

These files give us the same functionality as the hwdb – we can drop in extra files without recompiling. They’re more human-readable than a hwdb match and it’s a lot easier to add extra match conditions to it. And we can extend the file format at will. But the biggest advantage is that we can quite easily write debugging tools to figure out why something works or doesn’t work. The libinput list-quirks tool shows what tags apply to a device and using the –verbose flag shows you all the files and sections and how they apply or don’t apply to your device.

As usual, the libinput documentation has details.


Source From: fedoraplanet.org.
Original article title: Peter Hutterer: libinput and its device quirks files.
This full article can be read at: Peter Hutterer: libinput and its device quirks files.

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