Richard Hughes: Fun with SuperIO

While I’m waiting back for NVMe vendors (already one tentatively onboard!) I’ve started looking at “embedded controller” devices. The EC on your laptop historically used to just control the PS/2 keyboard and mouse, but now does fan control, power management, UARTs, GPIOs, LEDs, SMBUS, and various tasks the main CPU is too important to care about. Vendors issue firmware updates for this kind of device, but normally wrap up the EC update as part of the “BIOS” update as the system firmware and EC work together using various ACPI methods. Some vendors do the EC update out-of-band and so we need to teach fwupd about how to query the EC to get the model and version on that specific hardware. The Linux laptop vendor Tuxedo wants to update the EC and system firmware separately using the LVFS, and helpfully loaned me an InfinityBook Pro 13 that was immediately disassembled and connected to all kinds of exotic external programmers. On first impressions the N131WU seems quick, stable and really well designed internally — I’m sure would get a 10/10 for repairability.

At the moment I’m just concentrating on SuperIO devices from ITE. If you’re interested what SuperIO chip(s) you have on your machine you can either use superiotool from coreboot-utils or sensors-detect from lm_sensors. If you’ve got a SuperIO device from ITE please post what signature, vendor and model machine you have in the comments and I’ll ask if I need any more information from you. I’m especially interested in vendors that use devices with the signature 0x8587, which seems to be a favourite with the Clevo reference board. Thanks!


Source From: fedoraplanet.org.
Original article title: Richard Hughes: Fun with SuperIO.
This full article can be read at: Richard Hughes: Fun with SuperIO.

Advertisement


Random Article You May Like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*