Josh Bressers: Security isn’t a feature

As CES draws to a close, I’ve seen more than one security person complain that nobody at the show was talking about security. There were an incredible number of consumer devices unveiled, no doubt there is no security in any of them. I think we get caught up in the security world sometimes so we forget that the VAST majority of people don’t care if something has zero security. People want interesting features that amuse them or make their lives easier. Security is rarely either of these, generally it makes their lives worse so it’s an anti-feature to many.

Now the first thing many security people think goes something like this “if there’s no security they’ll be sorry when their lightbulb steals their wallet and dumps the milk on the floor!!!” The reality is that argument will convince nobody, it’s not even very funny so they’re laughing at us, not with us. Our thoughts by very nature blame all the wrong people and we try to scare them into listening to us. It’s never worked. Ever. That one time you think it worked they were only pretended to care so you would go away.

So it brings us to the idea that security isn’t a feature. Turning your lights on is a feature. Cooking you dinner is a feature. Driving your car is a feature. Not bursting into flames is not a feature. Well it sort of is, but nobody talks about it. Security is a lot like the bursting into flames thing. Security really is about something not happening, things not happening is the fundamental  problem we have when we try to talk about all this. You can’t build a plausible story around an event that may or may not happen. Trying to build a narrative around something that may or may not happen is incredibly confusing. This isn’t how feature work, features do positive things, they don’t not do negative things (I don’t even know if that’s right). Security isn’t a feature.

So the question you should be asking then is how do we make products being created contain more of this thing we keep calling security. The reality is we can’t make this happen given our current strategies. There are two ways products will be produced that are less insecure (see what I did there). Either the market demands it, which given the current trends isn’t happening anytime soon. People just don’t care about security. The second way is a government creates regulations that demand it. Given the current state of the world’s governments, I’m not confident that will happen either.

Let’s look at market demand first. If consumers decide that buying products that are horribly insecure is bad, they could start buying products with more built in security. But even the security industry can’t define what that really means. How can you measure which product has the best security? Consumers don’t have a way to know which products are safer. How to measure security could be a multi-year blog series so I won’t get into the details today.

What if the government regulates security? We sort of end up in a similar place to consumer demand. How do we define security? It’s a bit like defining safety I suppose. We’re a hundred years into safety regulations and still get a lot wrong and I don’t think anyone would argue defining safety is much easier than defining security. Security regulation would probably follow a similar path. It will be decades before things could be good enough to create real change. It’s very possible by then the machines will have taken over (that’s the secret third way security gets fixed, perhaps a post for another day).

So here we are again, things seem a bit doom and gloom. That’s not the intention of this post. The real purpose is to point out we have to change the way we talk about security. Yelling at vendors for building insecure devices isn’t going to ever work. We could possibly talk to consumers in a way that resonates with them, but does anyone buy the stove that promises to burst into flames the least? Nobody would ever use that as a marketing strategy. I bet it would have the opposite effect, a bit like our current behaviors and talking points I suppose.

Complaining that companies don’t take security seriously hasn’t ever worked and never will work. They need an incentive to care, us complaining isn’t an incentive. Stay tuned for some ideas on how to frame these conversations and who the audience needs to be.


Source From: fedoraplanet.org.
Original article title: Josh Bressers: Security isn’t a feature.
This full article can be read at: Josh Bressers: Security isn’t a feature.

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